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Bobby's Testimonial

I didn’t like what I had become. I would look in the mirror and think “Boy, you look just terrible.” I would get up some mornings and say, “I don’t feel like getting up.” I just wanted to stay in bed or get in my chair and do nothing. It was just tough to carry that much weight around all the time. If I did any kind of exercise or play any sports my back would just kill me the next day. I was just miserable.

Bobby's Full Story

Right out of high school I started gaining weight, but I was playing sports–softball, flag football, and the weight wasn’t much of an issue because I was in good health. When I turned 40 I quit playing softball, and I was gaining probably five to ten pounds a year. It got ridiculous.

It disappointed me that I couldn’t get out there on the field. If I did my ankles hurt, my knees hurt and the next morning I hurt all over. Life was not as fun or as enjoyable as it should have been. Diabetes runs in my family, and all of the sudden my sugar shot up. I didn’t watch it like I should have, and it started to become a real problem. I needed to be real careful about what I consumed, but I wanted my sweet tea, pies and cakes. So life became miserable.

I didn’t like what I had become. I would look in the mirror and think, “Boy, you just look terrible.” I would get up some mornings and say, “I don’t feel like getting up.” I just wanted to stay in bed or get in my chair and do nothing. It was just tough to carry that much weight around all the time. If I did any kind of exercise or play any sports my back would just kill me the next day. I was just miserable.

I would make some pretty good jokes about myself sometimes. It was my defense so that other people wouldn’t make fun of me. I let them know I knew I was overweight by joking around quite a bit about my weight. But when I was alone, I hated the image of what I had become. I knew it wasn’t a very good example for others. I wanted to lose weight, but I felt it was almost a defeated cause. I could lose weight, but keeping it off was tough.

I tried sugar busters, I tried counting calories several times. Counting calories everyday, trying to figure out how many calories you were eating was not easy. I finally just gave up. I would try to watch some of the stuff I would eat, but I would always give into Southern fried foods. It is tough when you grow up in a family that enjoys eating, to go home for celebrations and not indulge. Many times I would lose weight only to gain it back as soon as I attended a family or church gathering. If someone gave me sweets I would just say, “Let’s eat and enjoy it.”

My wife is a registered nurse. My health worried her. My weight worried her. I had diabetes and high blood pressure. She was concerned, and I began thinking about having weight loss surgery. My sister had the same surgery in 1993 and lost 150 pounds. She kept it off and has actually lost some more. I began talking with my sister and others who knew what I was going through and made the decision to have weight loss surgery. I knew I was going to have to do something drastic.

As I talked with them, they encouraged me. My wife came home one day and said, “Have you ever considered gastric bypass surgery?” I told her I had, and she said we needed to go to a seminar. I told her I would love to go.

After attending Dr. Scott’s educational seminar I realized this is what I needed and decided this is what I am going to do.

I had gastric bypass surgery on April 20, 2009. My highest weight was 282. Today I weigh 184 pounds, and 98 pounds later, I feel wonderful. I can do things I didn’t know I could do.

Before, I hated exercise, but now I enjoy golf, walking and jogging.  I even have run two 5Ks.

After my surgery, I had to change my golf swing! I had swung around my stomach for so long that all of the sudden my swing changed. Before, when I played golf, I would get back to the cart and be glad to sit down. Now I want to walk to the next hole. I am in the best shape I have been in probably since I was 30 years old, and I feel better than I have felt in probably 40 years. Because of weight-loss surgery, I am living a more active, productive lifestyle.

Three months after surgery, I was able to stop taking medications for high blood pressure, diabetes and cholesterol. Now, I look forward to blood tests so I can say, look how much I have improved. Now I don’t take any prescription medications.

I was out walking one day, and my shoe came untied. When I was overweight, I would have looked for something to put my foot up on so I could still breathe when I bent over. I couldn’t find anything, so decided I’d just hold my breath. But, as I bent over, I didn’t have to hold my breath. That’s when it hit me: “Wow, I didn’t even know I could do this.”